Breaking the bead on beadlocks

sm31

Active Member
Need some advice on removing tires from beadlock wheels...

After installing tires on beadlocks a few years ago, I'm about to attempt my first swap. I've seen a few methods for breaking the bead on the back of the beadlocks, including:

1) Jumping up and down on the tire while it sits on a 5 gallon bucket. This one probably won't work for me. I'm not very heavy... and I'm probably not lucky enough to find an indestructible bucket either.
2) putting the tire under something like the edge of a bumper or trailer and using a jack underneath to pop the bead. This one is plausible, I have a high lift & floor jack... but I'm not sure I have a good bumper or whatever option to put the tire under.
3) Using a floor jack and ratchet straps. I have ratchet straps too but repeating this process 3x per wheel looks awfully tedious.

Are there any other methods out there? I'm a little concerned to try any of the above but if y'all recommend one (or something else!) of them then I'll give it a try. Thanks!!
 

sm31

Active Member
If you dont want to haul them to a shop, this should work.. probably just need a longer 2x4 returning to the Jack, attached to the 4x4. It wasn’t the fastest, but it worked.

View attachment 377708

Thank you sir! That is a different and more simple tie strap method! I may try that!

Hoping to go the DIY route and save a little dough in these tough times. But I'll take them to the tire store if/when I admit defeat. Lol...
 

Speedy_RCW

Active Member
Need some advice on removing tires from beadlock wheels...

After installing tires on beadlocks a few years ago, I'm about to attempt my first swap. I've seen a few methods for breaking the bead on the back of the beadlocks, including:

1) Jumping up and down on the tire while it sits on a 5 gallon bucket. This one probably won't work for me. I'm not very heavy... and I'm probably not lucky enough to find an indestructible bucket either.
2) putting the tire under something like the edge of a bumper or trailer and using a jack underneath to pop the bead. This one is plausible, I have a high lift & floor jack... but I'm not sure I have a good bumper or whatever option to put the tire under.
3) Using a floor jack and ratchet straps. I have ratchet straps too but repeating this process 3x per wheel looks awfully tedious.

Are there any other methods out there? I'm a little concerned to try any of the above but if y'all recommend one (or something else!) of them then I'll give it a try. Thanks!!
I use the hi-lift method. Works fine. There’s nothing quick about swapping tires on beadlocks so just crack some beers and enjoy the work.
 

cozdude

Guy with a Red 2-Door
Take to a tire shop after you remove the bead and have them dismount the tires for you. I used my tire machine at work to dismount my old 35’s when I jumped to 37’s
 

sm31

Active Member
Sounds like there is a strong consensus here... Think I'll try the high lift method from Speedy_RCW's suggestion... especially the beer, (gotta try once at least) then pack it all to the tire shop. 😅

Thanks again everyone!
 

Speedy_RCW

Active Member
Sounds like there is a strong consensus here... Think I'll try the high lift method from Speedy_RCW's suggestion... especially the beer, (gotta try once at least) then pack it all to the tire shop. 😅

Thanks again everyone!

👍 I just put one on the ground behind the jeep and put the hi-lift between the tire and hitch receiver on the jeep. Get the jack base close to the wheel but not too close as you don’t want it to gouge. Oh and leave the ring on when you do this. Once the bead is broke on the back, then take the ring off. If you take the ring off first the wheel will just tilt in the tire and it won’t break the bead. You may have to stand on the tire next to the jack base if it’s being stubborn.
 

sm31

Active Member
👍 I just put one on the ground behind the jeep and put the hi-lift between the tire and hitch receiver on the jeep. Get the jack base close to the wheel but not too close as you don’t want it to gouge. Oh and leave the ring on when you do this. Once the bead is broke on the back, then take the ring off. If you take the ring off first the wheel will just tilt in the tire and it won’t break the bead. You may have to stand on the tire next to the jack base if it’s being stubborn.

Great idea!! I was thinking about using a slider but it wasn't a good "corner" like the hitch. I'll definitely try that instead!

....then head to the tire shop. 🤣
 

kevman65

Active Member
Dad used to put a 2"x4" inside a piece of 4" channel iron about 6' long, wood side down on semi tire, then drive the 1 ton Chevy dually up the angle iron to break the bead.

Then of course his free slave labor burly high school wrestler had to spoon the damned things off :rolleyes:
 

Cousin Clyde

Active Member
After 3 hours repeatedly trying all the different methods... and not a hint of progress, I began to feel guilty for depriving tire shops of their livelihood.

But the beer was tasty. 🍺

Sounds like I’m a little late to this, but the last time I used the hi lift method, I struggled. So I put some of the ruglyde that wayolife suggests in the video (youtube link below) between the bead and the wheel and i was able to break them free. I’ll never touch tires without this stuff again. Picked it up at NAPA.

Of course it’s helpful for sliding your new tire on as well, if you haven’t done that yet.

 

sm31

Active Member
Sounds like I’m a little late to this, but the last time I used the hi lift method, I struggled. So I put some of the ruglyde that wayolife suggests in the video (youtube link below) between the bead and the wheel and i was able to break them free. I’ll never touch tires without this stuff again. Picked it up at NAPA.

Of course it’s helpful for sliding your new tire on as well, if you haven’t done that yet.


I may have to try that next time. I've had good luck with soapy water for installation, and I did try using it to break the bead. Ended up taking them to a guy who had a hydraulic machine. Charged me $20, and some good conversation. I'd have paid 4x as much but he insisted. So it all ended up a blessing in disguise because I met one of those rare "really good to know" people.

Install was easy as pie. I got them all done in about 2 hrs, including all the torque wrench work.

The new tires are the Mickey Thompson Baja Boss A/T, 35x12.50 r17. Currently doing a lot more "road miles" than I would prefer, so I was looking for a hybrid A/T, and I liked what I was hearing and reading about these. Looking forward to adding them to the tire size thread because they seem pretty large. Definitely larger than my old M/T's.

edit: I dunno what I was thinking with the size. They ARE larger than my worn out M/T's but they seem to measure out about like all the other 35's.
 
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jpkjeep

Member
X2 on the bead buster. Someone on this forum recommended it to me a year ago. I was hesitant to spend the $$$. Totally worth it though. Makes life so much easier. The HD especially of you'rw working with big tires.
 

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