Ride quality of coilovers vs regular coil springs

WJCO

Meme King
For those of you that run coilovers and still use your Jeeps a decent amount of time on the pavement, is the ride quality still decent? I'll admit I don't know much at all about coilovers but if I decide to build up the JT, I'm going to go big and do it once. With that being said, this truck is still used for long road trips and my family nor I would appreciate the extra cost spending if the ride isn't nice.

Once I do this, I'll be going 40s so I'm probably going to be running 5-6 inches of lift. I don't want to regret getting coil springs and wish I'd gone coilovers. And I don't want to get coilovers and then wish I had just gone with regular springs.

I understand the benefits off-road and understand the extra maintenance with coilovers. My main question is ride quality on longer trips on the highway.

I will likely do bolt ons and I will definitely do long arms.

 

OverlanderJK

Resident Smartass
I could be wrong.. but I see you using your rig for exploring/camping/family trips/ to get out fishing/ a daily driver & as a weekend warrior... I say keep it simple and fun to drive... make drivability, durability & Longevity the priority. A quality lift, decent shocks, Steering upgrades.. 35’s or 37’s and drive it.. A lot. You start going big/expensive and it’s gonna be parked like the JK was... for one reason or another.
I see his rig used more for his wife to go to the grocery store. Lol
 
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HighwayTrout

Active Member
I could be wrong.. but I see you using your rig for exploring/camping/family trips/ to get out fishing/ a daily driver & as a weekend warrior... I say keep it simple and fun to drive... make drivability, durability & Longevity the priority. A quality lift, decent shocks, Steering upgrades.. 35’s or 37’s and drive it.. A lot. You start going big/expensive and it’s gonna be parked like the JK was... for one reason or another.
I almost reported this. 🤣

Very true. And all those things are what got me into a Jeep. Stock Rubicons can get me to 99% of the places I enjoy. Just knowing the itch to build won’t be going away and might as well plan it out. Absolutely not looking to go crazy. Just want a reliable, simple and clean build. But when I do use it, it needs to be able to perform and with comfort.
 
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TrailHunter

Active Member
I almost reported this. 🤣

Very true. And all those things are what got me into a Jeep. Stock Rubicons can get me to 99% of the places I enjoy. Just knowing the itch to build won’t be going away and might as well plan it out. Absolutely not looking to go crazy. Just want a reliable, simple and clean build. But when I do use it, it needs to be able to perform and with comfort.
Those new year runs with Eddie do get pretty intense.. 😂
 
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jdofmemi

Active Member
where's the fun in reason??
I know, right😁

If I listened to the voice of reason, I might not even have one Jeep, much less two, and instead of a second Jeep, I would have spent the money on furniture and shit for the house.

Then I decided it was more fun Jeeping than sitting in the house, so I really didn't need furniture anyway 🤣
 
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Kuboske

Member
This is a very interesting thread. My thoughts are to buy a new, JL, and keep the mods., conservative, and basic, to retain daily driver, reliability.
In order to satisfy the need for more radical offroad fun, just build one of my older, cheaper, short Jeeps. Less cost involved, less cost to insure, (my 2 Jeeps cost about $300/year in insurance), small and easy to trailer to far away places. Altogether less investment to risk, having fun.
And yes, my wife could use the new, very capable, JL, to get groceries.
I realize, you guys, (most), go way beyond what I do offroad.
Just my .02.
I also have many other hobbies, and only limited $$$.
P.S. The cost of those Dana 60's alone, would go a good ways towards a GenRight, equipped TJ, or YJ...
 
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CalSgt

Caught the Bug
This is a very interesting thread. My thoughts are to buy a new, JL, and keep the mods., conservative, and basic, to retain daily driver, reliability.
In order to satisfy the need for more radical offroad fun, just build one of my older, cheaper, short Jeeps. Less cost involved, less cost to insure, (my 2 Jeeps cost about $300/year in insurance), small and easy to trailer to far away places. Altogether less investment to risk, having fun.
And yes, my wife could use the new, very capable, JL, to get groceries.
I realize, you guys, (most), go way beyond what I do offroad.
Just my .02.
I also have many other hobbies, and only limited $$$.
P.S. The cost of those Dana 60's alone, would go a good ways towards a GenRight, equipped TJ, or YJ...
A friend of mine just bought a Genright LJ rolling chassis... $60K without drivetrain (another $20-25K ?) or any of the nickel & dime stuff

I'm less than $80K total into my JL which has proven to be comfortable, well equipped with creature comforts, daily drivable and fantastic off-road...
 
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Kuboske

Member
A friend of mine just bought a Genright LJ rolling chassis... $60K without drivetrain (another $20-25K ?) or any of the nickel & dime stuff

I'm less than $80K total into my JL which has proven to be comfortable, well equipped with creature comforts, daily drivable and fantastic off-road...
Yeah, I understand my example is kind of a apples to oranges, comparison.
I was speaking more to a self-builder, using the GenRight, Legend, Suspension package. $9000, and gets you a suspension (coilovers), kit, armor, sliders, fuel tank, etc. Then maybe build a less costly 9", rear, used d44, rubicon front.
Play harder with the older, builder, rig, and save the new JL, for less intense stuff, and maintain family, daily driver, trade-in, ability. Or, save it for building, after it gets enough age, that it takes the spot as second vehicle.
OP, has a brand new JT, and needs it for a broad range of duty, I believe...
 
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jdofmemi

Active Member
Yeah, I understand my example is kind of a apples to oranges, comparison.
I was speaking more to a self-builder, using the GenRight, Legend, Suspension package. $9000, and gets you a suspension (coilovers), kit, armor, sliders, fuel tank, etc. Then maybe build a less costly 9", rear, used d44, rubicon front.
Play harder with the older, builder, rig, and save the new JL, for less intense stuff, and maintain family, daily driver, trade-in, ability. Or, save it for building, after it gets enough age, that it takes the spot as second vehicle.
OP, has a brand new JT, and needs it for a broad range of duty, I believe...
Sounds like not a bad plan, except for the part about using the Rubicon D-44.
The gears are fine in it, and with upgrades, the axles are fine too, but the housing and "C"s are prone to bend if pushed very hard, or even by inadvertently hitting an unseen dip or washout in the road a bit hard.

Something like a PR-44 is a much better choice.
 
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Irish JK

Caught the Bug
A friend of mine just bought a Genright LJ rolling chassis... $60K without drivetrain (another $20-25K ?) or any of the nickel & dime stuff

I'm less than $80K total into my JL which has proven to be comfortable, well equipped with creature comforts, daily drivable and fantastic off-road...
To be clear, the Genright LJs seen on social media lately are nowhere near $80k.
 
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Kuboske

Member
I'm sure.... I assumed Kuboske was talking about this set up
https://genright.com/products/tracer-jeep-wrangler-lj-complete-rolling-chassis.html

I'm not sure what other options my friend ordered or what the delivery charge will be but his bill was 59 & change
That would be in a perfect world. But, I always have to build my own.
I might go this route with my YJ. Both of my Jeeps have rust free frames, so would make good starting points.
Still, once finished, would be a $20K, older Jeep. Hard to ever recoup investment, but, less than half a new JL.
Another thing that occurred to me if a guy builds a new Jeep, to the level many here do, is insurance. I would think you would have to purchase "agreed", value, rather than standard, "stated", value policy. A very small amount of mods., in this day and age would result in the need to up insure.
 
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Ddays

Active Member
Another thing that occurred to me if a guy builds a new Jeep, to the level many here do, is insurance. I would think you would have to purchase "agreed", value, rather than standard, "stated", value policy. A very small amount of mods., in this day and age would result in the need to up insure.

Nope. Talked with my State Farm guy several times regarding this. As long as I have receipts, no need for extra coverage.
 
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Seahawkfan

Active Member
EVO Coil-Over kits come with sway-bar end links. One is 13 1/4" and the other is 14 1/4". They both seem really long to me. I went ahead and put the longer one on the rear. What do you think? The rear looks like it will make contact with brake hard line fitting bracket mounted on the frame rail and the front looks like will hit the old coil spring upper housing.??? Thanks 20210608_195838.jpg 20210608_195851.jpg 20210608_195934.jpg 20210608_195946.jpg
 

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wjtstudios

Active Member
I used the EVO 14.5” in the rear and bought EVO adjustables up front. They measured 13.5 on one side and 14.5” on the passenger.

93FF7E51-2BD0-4E3E-802C-8F76AFD086D3.jpeg
 
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Seahawkfan

Active Member
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