10k with a 1/2 ton

desertrunner

Active Member
Might open a can of worms with this question but anyone out there seasonal towing 10k +/- 1k with a half ton?
I'm stuck between a rock and a hard place. I weighed my 4dr on this last trip and my best calculations puts me at a loaded weight (jeep, trailer, people, gear, etc) at 10k +/- some for tools and or new baby load.
In theory those Ford ecoboosts are in the 12-13k range but man that makes nervous putting that much weight behind a 1/2 ton. I am also trying to be realistic in that I'm not towing every weekend (6 or so times a year but usually multi thousand mile trips) and it will be my wife's primary driver with a new born and she isn't stoked on the idea of a 3/4 ton. Maybe I'm just paranoid but wanted to hear some opinions.

 

JT@623

Caught the Bug
I wouldn’t either. in case of an accident if it is found your overweight game over your insurance won’t cover it not to mention the other legal bullshit . Had a friend years ago ended up bankrupt for that very scenario.
 

desertrunner

Active Member
For argument sake. A new F150 configured correctly on paper max tow is 13k. A new F250 base config starts at 12.5k. so technically there are F150s out there that will tow on paper more than F250s. Do I totally buy it, no, but I do believe modern tech has come a long way and for a seasonal tow rig maybe it would be totally fine. Just somehow that 10k IMO is sketchy for a 1/2 regardless of what the manual says
 

OverlanderJK

Resident Smartass
For argument sake. A new F150 configured correctly on paper max tow is 13k. A new F250 base config starts at 12.5k. so technically there are F150s out there that will tow on paper more than F250s. Do I totally buy it, no, but I do believe modern tech has come a long way and for a seasonal tow rig maybe it would be totally fine. Just somehow that 10k IMO is sketchy for a 1/2 regardless of what the manual says
Why ask us then? Do what it is you want to. The gladiator is rated to tow 7k pounds. Doesn’t mean anyone actually would.
 

MericaMade

Active Member
I have a 18 F150 with the 12k tow rating. I towed my Jeep with a 20 foot trailer lightly loaded maybe around 7k pounds with stuff in bed and it towed 400 miles just fine. But personally I don't think I would want to push 8k or more with it. It did stop and go just fine but I think 10k would be asking a lot out of that truck.
 

notnalc68

That dude from Mississippi
Have you much experience at towing?

My Hemi Ram 1500 is rated for something like 9500 lbs. My Dad’s 2003 Chevy 2500 with a 6.0 liter is rated for around 8600 lbs. I’ve towed with each, and which do you think tows better? The 2500, even though it has over 100 hp less.

Like Overlander said, short hauls maybe, but I don’t think I’d do very much hauling of that much weight with a half ton.
 

wjtstudios

Hooked
I agree with the guys, if you we just towing thru Kansas, you probably be fine, but factoring in mountains and long distances, the weight, suspension, braking, and cooling ability of the 3/4 tons is levels above a 1/2 ton. The difference is the 1/2 tons are designed today for comfort and they can tow a trailer. A 3/4 ton is designed to tow, and they make them as comfortable as they can. I wouldn’t go less than a 3/4 ton, especially with my family in the truck with me.
 

CalSgt

Active Member
I agree with the guys, if you we just towing thru Kansas, you probably be fine, but factoring in mountains and long distances, the weight, suspension, braking, and cooling ability of the 3/4 tons is levels above a 1/2 ton. The difference is the 1/2 tons are designed today for comfort and they can tow a trailer. A 3/4 ton is designed to tow, and they make them as comfortable as they can. I wouldn’t go less than a 3/4 ton, especially with my family in the truck with me.
I vote 3/4 ton too, like WJT says it's your families safety at stake.

I'd say the modern 3/4 ton rides nicer than the 1/2 ton trucks of the '70's & '80's, my Duramax rides really nice when there isn't 80 PSI in the tires
 

Primo82

Caught the Bug
I wouldn't do more then the 80% mark on any towing.
This is what I was going to say. Unless something says it's specifically rated to run at it's rating, I always err on the side of caution and try to keep loads under 80%. This goes for everything from electrical circuits I need to lay out to towing and anything in between I don't know anything about :p.

My wife wants to get a horse trailer to take her horses to trails and wanted me to pull it with my jeep (she doesn't know any better). I said no way. And I probably wouldn't even pull a horse trailer on a 3/4 ton. I want a 1 ton with a 5th wheel. Safety and safety factor to make sure I don't toast the engine and transmission.
 

Bear_JT

Active Member
Go with a 3/4 ton at the least. Like the others have said it’s really a safety thing. Sure a 1/2 ton these days can pull a lot but when it comes down to normal breaking/stopping in an emergency you’ll be so much safer with the bigger and stronger truck. It’ll also save you more in things like fuel, wear and tear, …
 

Dale72

Active Member
When it comes to towing you need a truck that is capable of towing a lot more than what you are planning on towing. For braking and handling
 

Brute

Hooked
This is what I was going to say. Unless something says it's specifically rated to run at it's rating, I always err on the side of caution and try to keep loads under 80%. This goes for everything from electrical circuits I need to lay out to towing and anything in between I don't know anything about :p.

My wife wants to get a horse trailer to take her horses to trails and wanted me to pull it with my jeep (she doesn't know any better). I said no way. And I probably wouldn't even pull a horse trailer on a 3/4 ton. I want a 1 ton with a 5th wheel. Safety and safety factor to make sure I don't toast the engine and transmission.
Tell her you need a JT with a 392...
 
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