Progressive shocks?

ginger19d

New member
Seems progressive shocks are best for the chatterboards of local logging roads. Ohlins are the only progressive setup I'm finding but I'd like to do a 2.5" under 2k including control arms and track bars. Ohlins are 3k shocks alone and distributors are few and far between.
 

wayoflife

Administrator
Staff member
I don't know if I'd call Ohlins "progressive", more rather, they're adjustable for both compression AND rebound and have an internal bump zone. That said, they are way expensive for just local logging roads. For that, I would recommend load range C tires and airing them down to about 16-18 psi. That'll smooth out the chatter way better than ANY shock out there and it's FREE :)
 

ginger19d

New member
I don't know if I'd call Ohlins "progressive", more rather, they're adjustable for both compression AND rebound and have an internal bump zone. That said, they are way expensive for just local logging roads. For that, I would recommend load range C tires and airing them down to about 16-18 psi. That'll smooth out the chatter way better than ANY shock out there and it's FREE :)
I did some digging into progressive, linear and digressive. It had ohlins in the progressive category, their piston looks different than the others at the least.
What do you recommend for shocks in my budget? Seems if I build my own kit I can pick up the middle range foxes, bilsteins and any king. Who else should I research?
 

wayoflife

Administrator
Staff member
I did some digging into progressive, linear and digressive. It had ohlins in the progressive category, their piston looks different than the others at the least.
What do you recommend for shocks in my budget? Seems if I build my own kit I can pick up the middle range foxes, bilsteins and any king. Who else should I research?
Like I said, for the kind of washboards you're asking about, even the most expensive Kings won't do as much as airing down will. Softer springs would be what I would recommend next as aside from tires, they provide the most ride comfort. Shocks are designed to smooth things out by absorbing bigger hits (compression) and then reducing bounciness (rebound) after the hits. Some shocks do this better at this and some don't but NONE can compensate for bowling balls for tires or really stiff springs. In fact, I often hear from people who've spent a boat load on shocks and still bitch about their ride and when pressed about what they're running, too much air or really stiff springs is almost always the problem.

In other words, I wouldn't feel right about recommending that you spend any money on anything until you've first addressed tire load rating, air pressure and spring stiffness.
 

ginger19d

New member
Round here a 6 ply tire will get cut on the shale they use for road top so I'm pretty stuck on e load range. My first 2 years up here I had to hike 5 miles out due to tire issues. I will try airing them down though, I never thought of that.
 

wayoflife

Administrator
Staff member
Round here a 6 ply tire will get cut on the shale they use for road top so I'm pretty stuck on e load range. My first 2 years up here I had to hike 5 miles out due to tire issues. I will try airing them down though, I never thought of that.
Yeah, I've wheeled up in Maine and know what you're talking about. Arizona has wicked trails that are worse and understand your desire for range E tires. That said, I have run E many times before and the best option to smooth things out is to air down a lot more. I'd say, 10-12 on the washboards.
 

wayoflife

Administrator
Staff member
And to be clear, I run top of the line King coilovers and bypass shocks on 2 of my rigs and Ohlins on my 392 and airing down is still the single best thing I do to smooth out washboards.
 

wayoflife

Administrator
Staff member
Thank you. I'll try it out and pass it along.
Happy to help save you some money especially being that it is something you need to consider.

One other thing I should note about adjustable high end shocks, MOST go from stiff, stiffer and then to stiffest. And, this is great if you drive really hard and fast across the desert and hit big ruts or whoops as they'll help to keep your Jeep together but, they totally suck for daily driving and or for washboards. Just something to keep in mind.
 

ginger19d

New member
Happy to help save you some money especially being that it is something you need to consider.

One other thing I should note about adjustable high end shocks, MOST go from stiff, stiffer and then to stiffest. And, this is great if you drive really hard and fast across the desert and hit big ruts or whoops as they'll help to keep your Jeep together but, they totally suck for daily driving and or for washboards. Just something to keep in mind.
I'm at 20 k miles and the suspension rebound leaves a lot to be desired at times. If I were to hit the sweet spot at 20k and have to replace at 50k vs 25 or 30, I'd take it.
I've just spent a lot of time researching and building a shopping cart jeep lately. By time I have the money to do something major, I'll be really informed.
Hopefully airing the tires down will produce enough of effect I can skate by on cheaper lift kits and focus on better parts elsewhere, like a regear and communication equipment.
 

wayoflife

Administrator
Staff member
I'm at 20 k miles and the suspension rebound leaves a lot to be desired at times. If I were to hit the sweet spot at 20k and have to replace at 50k vs 25 or 30, I'd take it.
I've just spent a lot of time researching and building a shopping cart jeep lately. By time I have the money to do something major, I'll be really informed.
Hopefully airing the tires down will produce enough of effect I can skate by on cheaper lift kits and focus on better parts elsewhere, like a regear and communication equipment.
You can do all the research you want but in the end, ride comfort is 100% subjective and MOST people on the internet will swear by what they've chosen to spend their money on. Saying anything less would be admitting they made a mistake and no grown man would ever do that.

It is for this reason I would say to proceed slowly and NOT spend money on things just because you read about it on the internet. Experiment and make/buy modifications you on "need" or even "want" and based on personal experience. I've been doing this Jeep thing for over 25 years and have tested out a myriad of products both high and low end during that time and can say that only YOU can know what is best for you. The most anyone who's honest can do is point you in a better direction and based on that.
 

GP NOIR

Hooked
You can do all the research you want but in the end, ride comfort is 100% subjective and MOST people on the internet will swear by what they've chosen to spend their money on. Saying anything less would be admitting they made a mistake and no grown man would ever do that.

It is for this reason I would say to proceed slowly and NOT spend money on things just because you read about it on the internet. Experiment and make/buy modifications you on "need" or even "want" and based on personal experience. I've been doing this Jeep thing for over 25 years and have tested out a myriad of products both high and low end during that time and can say that only YOU can know what is best for you. The most anyone who's honest can do is point you in a better direction and based on that.
In my experience, all of the above is true, especially the part about admitting to a mistake. Experience has taught me that airing down the tires before hitting the trail is the single most effective mod you can make, regardless of tire or suspension on your rig. I have 35 inch BFG KM03s and I air them down to 12 psi for easy runs and 6 psi for harder trails, sand, snow and so on. The KM03s have a stiff sidewalk and I don’t have bead locks. I’ve had to reseat the tire beads a couple of times at 10 psi or less, but the KM03s really grab the trail at lower pressures. Experiment with tire pressure and keep notes to see what works in different conditions.

Fill the tank. Add recovery gear, air compressor and maps. Air down the tires. Hit the trails. Let your Jeep do the work. It will let you know what mods to make.

Don’t forget snackages and water.

…and the Jeep Dog. Don’t forget your Jeep Dog!
 
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CalSgt

Hooked
I don’t think I saw it mentioned above but running 10 ply tires at Jeep’s recommended tire pressure makes them ride horribly everywhere.

I’m sure tire size plays a big role in that too and it may not apply universally but it made a huge difference for me.

I run 26-30 psi daily and air down from there
 
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