Air Compressors - On Board or Not

Brute

Hooked
If I had to choose only one I would get the Viar 450P kit

I've tried a few different ones, here's my experiences

$70 slime unit - Failed first time I tried to air a trailer tire from 25 PSI to 60 PSI. Melted the hose right off of the compressor & left me stranded.

Viar 450P -
Pros - Portable Great compressor 100% duty cycle (under 100 PSI) and faster than a ARB singe, can be packed in any vehicle, airs up my 265/17R16's from 20PSI to 75 PSI in about 8 minutes each.
Cons - PIA to dig it out of a fully loaded Jeep to air up after a big trip, always a chance it is not with you when you need it

Mounted ARB Single -
Pros - Good compressor, can be mounted in an out of the way location, airs up 37/13.5R17's from 8PSI to about 28PSI in about 3 minutes per tire, always with you when its needed
Cons - Cant be taken in another vehicle, if you sell the vehicle it need to be uninstalled or replaced with the new vehicle, only has 50% duty cycle, mine has shut off (overheated maybe) a few times while airing up my final tire, at least it got me to 25 PSI which is drivable.

Power Tank - It was given to me because it was out of date & needed to be certified. Previous owner was sick of having to get it filled
Pros - can run air tools and has enough volume & pressure to seat tire beads, super fast air up times especially with the monster valves.
Cons - Super expensive, mounting brackets and accessories are expensive too, runs out & needs to be filled $20-30 each fill, super heavy when full and still heavy when empty, super bulky, rural areas don't usually have any place to refill, I have to take it to Reno 1.5 hours away for a refill. Tank needs to be recertified every 5 years, it took two weeks and $40 to get this done (at least they refilled it for that price.)
In addition to a hydrostatic test every five years (dot compliance), technically it should be internally visually inspected once a year, requiring removing the valve and inserting an inspection light to visually inspect the walls and neck/threads…
 

A.J.

Caught the Bug
I use a 10lb co2 tank with a simple 150psi regulator. The 10lb fit just right under the driver rear seat and recently nice and snug under the Goose Gear platform. I just exchange the tank when empty at a local welding supply. With 40’s I get 3-4 fill ups from 8psi to 30psi and it can run air tools if needed. I also have an ARB single on board that runs the lockers and as a backup air supply in case I run out of co2.
 

jpkjeep

Member
I use a 10lb co2 tank with a simple 150psi regulator. The 10lb fit just right under the driver rear seat and recently nice and snug under the Goose Gear platform. I just exchange the tank when empty at a local welding supply. With 40’s I get 3-4 fill ups from 8psi to 30psi and it can run air tools if needed. I also have an ARB single on board that runs the lockers and as a backup air supply in case I run out of co2.
Wow you really go through Co2! I was planning on keeping my shittybuilt as a backup. The exchange option would probably be more practical, that's a good idea. Thanks for the info 👍
 

GP NOIR

Active Member
Some things I've learned about the ARB Twin Compressor-
-Make sure there are no leaks in any part of the system, especially when inflating four tires at once. Leaks increase inflation time and the compressors have to work harder. While testing a four tire inflation hose I assembled, all four air chucks had leaks and the ARB 40 amp fuse blew.
-The pressure switch is set to cut power to the compressors at about 150 psi. When the pressure drops, it starts the compressors again. This isn't a problem when airing up tires because the pressure in the line will drop significantly. However, if there's a small leak, the pressure in the line when the compressor starts is much higher. If there is a leak in the line, the compressor will keep cycling and the amperage draw on each start will be high. With enough high pressure, high amp cycles, the fuses will blow.
-Most compressor systems have an unloader valve to release the pressure in the compressor outlet line. This reduces the amp draw when the compressor restarts. The ARB system does not. Something to keep in mind if constantly using the system.
-The outlet lines will quickly get really hot with use, even if the compressors are cold when starting.
-Any restriction in the inlet will make the compressors and motors work harder. The lines I used to relocate the filters to under the cowl (to keep them away from mud splashed up under the hood) were too soft and partially collapsed under suction. When relocating the inlet filters, eliminate all restrictions. Don't use lines that will collapse under suction. Don't use 1/4" line. Don't use sharp bends
-Anytime the compressors work harder, they run hotter. With more heat, the compressor motors draw more amps.
-The 40 amp fuses ARB uses are about $5 each and not commonly found. Get a couple of spares just in case.
 
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TrailHunter

Hooked
Some things I've learned about the ARB Twin Compressor-
-Make sure there are no leaks in any part of the system, especially when inflating four tires at once. Leaks increase inflation time and the compressors have to work harder. While testing a four tire inflation hose I assembled, all four air chucks had leaks and the ARB 40 amp fuse blew.
-The pressure switch is set to cut power to the compressors at about 150 psi. When the pressure drops, it starts the compressors again. This isn't a problem when airing up tires because the pressure in the line will drop significantly. However, if there's a small leak, the pressure in the line when the compressor starts is much higher. If there is a leak in the line, the compressor will keep cycling and the amperage draw on each start will be high. With enough high pressure, high amp cycles, the fuses will blow.
-Most compressor systems have an unloader valve to release the pressure in the compressor outlet line. This reduces the amp draw when the compressor restarts. The ARB system does not. Something to keep in mind if constantly using the system.
-The outlet lines will quickly get really hot with use, even if the compressors are cold when starting.
-Any restriction in the inlet will make the compressors and motors work harder. The lines I used to relocate the filters to under the cowl (to keep them away from mud splashed up under the hood) were too soft and partially collapsed under suction. When relocating the inlet filters, eliminate all restrictions. Don't use lines that will collapse under suction. Don't use 1/4" line. Don't use sharp bends
-Anytime the compressors work harder, they run hotter. With more heat, the compressor motors draw more amps.
-The 40 amp fuses ARB uses are about $5 each and not commonly found. Get a couple of spares just in case.

Or just leave the compressor as shipped.. use a single hose to fill up one tire at a time.. and utilize the extra spent 8 minutes to relax, look over the Jeep for the ride home, and think about what a great time you had wheelin. 😬
 

GP NOIR

Active Member
Or just leave the compressor as shipped..
I own a Jeep

…use a single hose to fill up only one tire at a time.. and utilize the extra spent 8 minutes to relax, look over the Jeep for the ride home, and think about what a great time you had wheelin. 😬

First, airing up all four tires at once ain’t the problem. The compressor and lines get just as hot when airing up only one tire at a time. The problem is leaks. Leaks make the compressor work harder and take longer to fill the tires.

Second, airing up four tires at once is a real advantage when the wind from Nevada is blowing sand/rain/sleet/snow to Colorado.
 
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jpkjeep

Member
Or just leave the compressor as shipped.. use a single hose to fill up one tire at a time.. and utilize the extra spent 8 minutes to relax, look over the Jeep for the ride home, and think about what a great time you had wheelin. 😬
Some things I've learned about the ARB Twin Compressor-
-Make sure there are no leaks in any part of the system, especially when inflating four tires at once. Leaks increase inflation time and the compressors have to work harder. While testing a four tire inflation hose I assembled, all four air chucks had leaks and the ARB 40 amp fuse blew.
-The pressure switch is set to cut power to the compressors at about 150 psi. When the pressure drops, it starts the compressors again. This isn't a problem when airing up tires because the pressure in the line will drop significantly. However, if there's a small leak, the pressure in the line when the compressor starts is much higher. If there is a leak in the line, the compressor will keep cycling and the amperage draw on each start will be high. With enough high pressure, high amp cycles, the fuses will blow.
-Most compressor systems have an unloader valve to release the pressure in the compressor outlet line. This reduces the amp draw when the compressor restarts. The ARB system does not. Something to keep in mind if constantly using the system.
-The outlet lines will quickly get really hot with use, even if the compressors are cold when starting.
-Any restriction in the inlet will make the compressors and motors work harder. The lines I used to relocate the filters to under the cowl (to keep them away from mud splashed up under the hood) were too soft and partially collapsed under suction. When relocating the inlet filters, eliminate all restrictions. Don't use lines that will collapse under suction. Don't use 1/4" line. Don't use sharp bends
-Anytime the compressors work harder, they run hotter. With more heat, the compressor motors draw more amps.
-The 40 amp fuses ARB uses are about $5 each and not commonly found. Get a couple of spares just in case.
That's good to know about the fuse blowing. I have had leaks with the 4 tire system I use cause overheating issues with my shittybuilt. There were times it was leaking because the chuck was not fully seated on the valve stem. Small enough that I didn't notice the leak, but enough to cause compressor issues.

Trailhunter- I don't think I could ever go back to one tire at a time at this point. Every test I have done has put it at least a few minutes faster. I also use the tazers airup feature. I just hangout for around 8 minutes and the Jeep honks when it's at street pressure. If I end up with a power tank I would go back to one at a time because I wouldn't really gain any efficiency.
 

TrailHunter

Hooked
Trailhunter- I don't think I could ever go back to one tire at a time at this point. Every test I have done has put it at least a few minutes faster. I also use the tazers airup feature. I just hangout for around 8 minutes and the Jeep honks when it's at street pressure. If I end up with a power tank I would go back to one at a time because I wouldn't really gain any efficiency.

Whatever Fills your Tires. 👍🏽
 

marc_e_marc23

New member
Just installed this ARB under the hood and works awesome to air up 37 inch tires.
 

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