2-door JL with RK 2.5" lift - feels bumpy. How to diagnose?

tengg2001

New member
Hi all,

I have a two door JL Rubicon. Installed a RK 2.5" lift with fox 2.0 IFP shock.

The rear upper control arm is adjustable for pinion correction. Everything else on suspension are stock.

It feels quite stiff and not the same as people described of what an RK lift should be.

Wondering if anyone could provide some insights? Want to figure out if it is what it is.. or there's something going wrong.

(I'm running stock 33" at 35-37psi depends on the temperature)

Thank you.
 
Last edited:
Not sure who the people are the described the lift to you but rock krawler is a stiffer coil because of the stupid triple rate coils. The coils are why your ride is stiff. Look at Rancho or EVO for softer coils.
What he said ^^^

I'd never get a dual or triple rate coil period, especially if you daily drive your Jeep. Those Fox 2.0s are on the stiffer side (or so I hear) and the best thing you could do is get a different spring and softer shock.
 
Upvote 0

wayoflife

Administrator
Staff member
Hi all,

I have a two door JL Rubicon. Installed a RK 2.5" lift with fox 2.0 IFP shock.

The rear upper control arm is adjustable for pinion correction. Everything else on suspension are stock.

It feels quite stiff and not the same as people described of what an RK lift should be.

Wondering if anyone could provide some insights? Want to figure out if it is what it is.. or there's something going wrong.

Thank you.
What the people you talked to told you is what they convinced themselves to believe. Admitting that what they chose to buy would mean they made a mistake and no grown man has ever done that.

That said, I would have to agree with what OverlanderJK said, the triple rate coils are stiff and springs to provide the bulk of your ride quality. Shocks are meant to smooth out your ride and may be contributing to what you're feeling but before going out and buying all new stuff, I would do what Disciple said and that's to check the psi in your tires. If you're running anything over 30, try lowering it down to about 28. That should help a bit.
 
Upvote 0

tengg2001

New member
What the people you talked to told you is what they convinced themselves to believe. Admitting that what they chose to buy would mean they made a mistake and no grown man has ever done that.

That said, I would have to agree with what OverlanderJK said, the triple rate coils are stiff and springs to provide the bulk of your ride quality. Shocks are meant to smooth out your ride and may be contributing to what you're feeling but before going out and buying all new stuff, I would do what Disciple said and that's to check the psi in your tires. If you're running anything over 30, try lowering it down to about 28. That should help a bit.
Thanks. I'm running on the stock 33" KO2. Most of the time I try to stick with door sticker specs, but I have seen discussions about running lower PSI. Is there a general suggestion of how many PSI to run on these? Or just try and feel it. Not sure if <30psi is too low for the 33s.
 
Upvote 0

wayoflife

Administrator
Staff member
Thanks. I'm running on the stock 33" KO2. Most of the time I try to stick with door sticker specs, but I have seen discussions about running lower PSI. Is there a general suggestion of how many PSI to run on these? Or just try and feel it. Not sure if <30psi is too low for the 33s.
With TPMS, you can only go down to 35 psi and I would run that. If you have a means to lower the pressure with something like a Tazer, Jscan or the like, I would do that and run 30. That will not only help with ride quality, it will also help your tires to wear more evenly. Start there.
 
Upvote 0

bobfriesenhahn

Active Member
added in the post. I mostly stick to the door sticker spec, 37psi, recently temperature dropped so around 35". It's the stock 33" KO2.
I run 37 PSI with the 33" KO2s and find that I have more wear in the center of the tire. I also travel between low elevation and high elevation and at high elevation the tire pressure increases and I can easily tell that most weight is in the center of the tire.

I am sure that the EPA and Greta are as happy with me as they could possibly be.

Now also due to improper tire rotation I need to replace my tires a year ahead of schedule.

A tread depth gauge is worth every penny, but I invested too late!
 
Upvote 0
Top Bottom